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Winter Commencement Ceremonies: Anthropology Department Graduation, Friday, December 19 at 3:00pm, Hale 270
Regalia and campus-wide ceremony information: http://www.colorado.edu/commencement/
Melanie Sarah Adams, Anthropology major, has been selected as the Outstanding Undergraduate of the College in Fall 2014! It is a real honor for her and for the department. Congratulations to Melanie.

Faculty Lecture – January 23, 2015 @ 4:00PM – Hale 230

John W. Ives,

Executive Director, Institute of Prairie Archaeology, Landrex Distinguished Professor,

Department of Anthropology

University of Alberta

“Promontory Point—Implications of a High Fidelity Archaeological Record for Apachean Migration”

Discussions of prehistoric migration are frequently founded upon ordinary archaeological records that present archaeologists with fundamental challenges. Nowhere would this be truer than in the Dene (Athapaskan) world, where we often deal with assemblages composed entirely of lithics, and where we know that Dene peoples shared a cultural genius for rapidly emulating neighboring material cultures. With their extraordinary preservation of all material culture, Utah’s Promontory Caves allow detailed interdisciplinary probing of Apachean migration, applying hypotheses developed in light of current migration theory in the social sciences.  Apachean ancestors who had left the Subarctic Canada encountered a turbulent AD 13th century world in which hunting and gathering lifestyles offered not simply an option, but at times, a highly preferable alternative to terminal Fremont and Puebloan lifeways, themselves undergoing profound change.

 

 

John W. Ives,

Executive Director, Institute of Prairie Archaeology, Landrex Distinguished Professor,

Department of Anthropology

University of Alberta

Public Lecture:  “The Ninth Clan—Exploring Apachean Origins in the Promontory Caves, Utah.”

Twentieth century anthropologist Julian Steward concluded in the 1930s that the Promontory Caves on Great Salt Lake, Utah, contained highly suggestive evidence that Navajo or Apache ancestors had lingered briefly in the eastern Great Basin on their way between Canada and the American Southwest. Compelling though Steward’s arguments were, comparatively few archaeologists took them seriously. Today we can use the astonishing array of perishable materials (including hundreds of moccasins, as well as mittens, other clothing, basketry bows, arrows, and bison robes) from Steward’s as well as our own more recent excavations in the Promontory Caves to illustrate how Steward was indeed correct, and how Dene ancestors originally from the Subarctic had begun their transformation toward historic Navajo and Apache cultural identities.

Hale Science Building, Saturday, January 24, 2015 at 7PM

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